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The Cold War Home Front: Anti-Commie Pop Culture
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Anti-Commie Pop Culture
A more detailed analysis of this topic is planned for the future. In the meantime, this small archive of sources is presented.
True Detective magazine
True Detective magazine v. 49, no. 5 with "The Creeps and the Atom Secret" story, 8/48
"The Naked and the Lost" (1954) by Franklin M. Davis
"The Naked and the Lost" (1954) by Franklin M. Davis
Freedom Fighters Anti-Bolshevik Button, 1956
Freedom Fighters Anti-Bolshevik Button, 1956
Stop Communism seals
Stop Communism seals
Drop the Bomb arm patch
Drop the Bomb arm patch
Good Housekeeping ad, "Sure I Want to fight Communism"
Good Housekeeping ad, "Sure I Want to fight Communism"
What Can I Do to Fight Communism?, c.1962
What Can I Do to Fight Communism?, c.1962 (complete)
Battle Cry, 8/61
Battle Cry, 8/61
F- - K the Russians pin
F- - K the Russians pin
[no larger image available]
The John Noble Story
The John Noble Story
sound side 1 | side 2
 
I Was a Communist For the FBI
I Was a Communist For the FBI
I Was a Communist for the FBI was originally a series of stories written by former FBI agent Matt Cvetic and published in the Saturday Evening Post. Cvetic had been asked by the FBI to join the Communist Party of the United States as an informant during the 1940s. Cvetic's articles were then turned into a book, and then a film, released in 1951. He then sold his stories in highly fictionalized form for a radio series which ran for 78 episodes from March 30, 1952 to September 20, 1953. The program was made without the cooperation or approval of the FBI. Ironically, the FBI received multitudes of fan mail as a result of the radio series. By today's standards, the radio series is campy, predictable, and sometimes downright silly. In other words, it's classic Cold War fun.
sound Sample Episodes: "American Kremlin" | "Treason Comes in Cans" | "Abby, as in Abigail"
 
Guarding the Iron Curtain
Mox Nix, G.I.
Mox Nix, G.I.
What was it like standing guard on the other side of the Iron Curtain in Europe during the heyday of the Cold War? Apparently, it wasn't all bad. Amidst the tensions and drills, the soldier stationed in West Germany still found ways to exercise his sense of humor. "Mox Nix, G.I." is a humorous fantasy about the Cold War soldier's tour of duty in Europe. Former soldiers Bill Churchill and George Casey provide the comic relief, recorded in 1964. sound Side 1 | Side 2
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Last modified July 18, 2012