The Authentic History Center Your current position is:
home > 1898-1913 > imperialism > beginnings > hawaii
The Beginnings of Imperialism: Hawaii
curve
The Beginnings of Imperialism: Hawaii
The Hawaiian Islands received little attention in American popular culture until the late Nineteenth Century. Following decades of a decline in the Native population from disease, Euro-American business interests backed by the State Department and a detachment of U.S. Marines effected the overthrow of Queen Liliuokalani and replaced her with a pro-annexation Provisional Government. Hawaii remained a republic until its annexation in 1898. The annexation coincided with the American defeat of the Spanish and the subsequent acquisition of Puerto Rico and the Philippines. Therefore, the three countries were often lumped together in political cartoons and non-fiction articles and books as America's "possessions." The Hawaiian islands were
extensively examined, along with the other possessions, in a set of books called, Our Island and Their People (1899). It was at this time that the subject of Hawaii began to appear in American sheet music. Americans became intrigued with the island "paraside" and 1915 saw a surge in Hawaii-related songs coming out of New York City's Tin Pan Alley. Whereas many of the early songs showcased actual native talent (many merged with another music fad--the coon song), the new songs were much more comical and nonsensical in style and content. Nevertheless, traditional Hawaiian music recorded on cylinders and 78s remained popular during this time. Perhaps most famous of all was the deposed queen's own composition, "Aloha Oe".

A more detailed examination of this topic is planned for the future. In the meantime, this collection of images and sounds is presented.
Our Island and Their People (1899)
Our Island and Their People (1899), A two-volume set designed to educate Americans on their new "possessions"
 
Sheet Music: Hawaiian Annexation March
Sheet Music: "Hawaiin Annexation March" (1898)
Sheet Music: "Melee Hawaii" (1898)
Sheet Music: "Melee Hawaii" (1898)
Sheet Music: "My Girl's a Hawaiian Maiden" (1898)
Sheet Music: "My Girl's a Hawaiian Maiden" (1898)
Sheet Music: "My Honolulu Lady" (1898)
Sheet Music: "My Honolulu Lady" (1898)
Sheet Music: "My Honolulu Queen" (1899)
Sheet Music: "My Honolulu Queen" (1899)
"My Honolulu Tom Boy" by Toots Paka's Hawaiians (1911)
sound "My Honolulu Tom Boy" by Toots Paka's Hawaiians (1911)
Sheet Music: "My Hula Hula Love" (1911)
Sheet Music: "My Hula Hula Love" (1911)
"My Hula Hula Love" by Metropolitan Quartet (1911)
sound "My Hula Hula Love" by Metropolitan Quartet (1911)
Sheet Music: "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" (1912)
Sheet Music: "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" (1912)
"Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" by Toot Paka's Hawaiians (1912)
sound "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" by Toot Paka's Hawaiians (1912)
Sheet Music: "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" (1913)
Sheet Music: "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" (1913)
Sheet Music: "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" (1913)
Sheet Music: "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" (1913)
"Hilo-Hawaiian March" by Irene West Royal Hawaiians (1914)
sound "Hilo-Hawaiian March" by Irene West Royal Hawaiians (1914)
"Hello Hawaii, How Are You?" by Dann W. Quinn (1915)
sound "Hello Hawaii, How Are You?" by Dann W. Quinn (1915)
"My Hula Maid" by Gladys Rice & Irving Kaufman (1915)
sound "My Hula Maid" by Gladys Rice & Irving Kaufman (1915)
Sheet Music: "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" (1915)
Sheet Music: "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" (1915)
Sheet Music: "When Old Bill Bailey Plays The Ukalele" (1915)
Sheet Music: "When Old Bill Bailey Plays The Ukalele" (1915)
"Wailana Waltz" by Lua and Kaili (1915)
sound "Wailana Waltz" by Lua and Kaili (1915)
"Hawaiian Medley" by July Paka (1915)
sound "Hawaiian Medley" by July Paka (1915)
"Kawaihau" by July Paka (1915)
sound "Kawaihau" by July Paka (1915)
"Honolulu Rag" by Pali_Kula & Dave Kaili (1915)
sound "Honolulu Rag" by Pali Kula & Dave Kaili (1915)
"Kaiwi Waltz" by Pali Kula & Dave Kaili (1915)
sound "Kaiwi Waltz" by Pali Kula & Dave Kaili (1915)
"Hapa Haole Hula Girl" by Helen Louis & Frank Ferera (1915)
sound "Hapa Haole Hula Girl" by Helen Louis & Frank Ferera (1915)
"On The Beach at Waikiki" by Helen Louise & Frank Ferera (1915)
sound "On The Beach at Waikiki" by Helen Louise & Frank Ferera (1915)
"I Left Her On The Beach At Honolulu" by Walter Van Brunt (1916)
sound "I Left Her On The Beach At Honolulu" by Walter Van Brunt (1916)
"Oh! How She Could Yacki Hacki Wicki Wacki Woo (That's Love in Honolulu)" by Collins & Harlan
sound "Oh! How She Could Yacki Hacki Wicki Wacki Woo (That's Love in Honolulu)" by Collins & Harlan
"She Sang "Aloha" To Me" by Walter Van Brunt (1916)
sound "She Sang "Aloha" To Me" by Walter Van Brunt (1916)
Sheet Music: "Honolulu, America Loves You (We've Got To Hand It To You)" (1916)
Sheet Music: "Honolulu, America Loves You (We've Got To Hand It To You)" (1916)
"Honolulu, America Loves You (We’ve Got To Hand It To You)" by Arthur Fields (1917)
sound "Honolulu, America Loves You (We’ve Got To Hand It To You)" by Arthur Fields (1917)
Sheet Music: "I Lost My Heart In Honolulu" (1916)
Sheet Music: "I Lost My Heart In Honolulu" (1916)
Sheet Music: "O’Brien Is Tryin’ To Learn To Talk Hawaiian" (1916)
Sheet Music: "O’Brien Is Tryin’ To Learn To Talk Hawaiian" (1916)
"O’Brien Is Tryin’ To Learn To Talk Hawaiian" by Ada Jones (1917)
sound "O’Brien Is Tryin’ To Learn To Talk Hawaiian" by Ada Jones (1917)
"Yaaka Hula Hickey Dula" by Walter Van Brunt (1916)
sound "Yaaka Hula Hickey Dula" by Walter Van Brunt (1916)
"Hawaiian Butterfly" by Performed by Helen Louise & Frank Ferera (1917)
sound "Hawaiian Butterfly" by Performed by Helen Louise & Frank Ferera (1917)
"Hawaiian Dreams" by Waikiki Hawaiian Orchestra (1917)
sound "Hawaiian Dreams" by Waikiki Hawaiian Orchestra (1917)
"My Waikiki Mermaid" by Waikiki Hawaiian Orchestra (1917)
sound "My Waikiki Mermaid" by Waikiki Hawaiian Orchestra (1917)
Sheet Music: "Along The Way to Waikiki" (1917)
Sheet Music: "Along The Way to Waikiki" (1917)
"They’re Wearing ’Em Higher In Hawaii" by American Quartet (1917)
sound "They’re Wearing ’Em Higher In Hawaii" by American Quartet (1917)
"Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" by Alma Gluck (1917)
sound "Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)" by Alma Gluck (1917)
"Aloha Land" by Waikiki Hawaiian Orchestra (1918)
sound "Aloha Land" by Waikiki Hawaiian Orchestra (1918)
"My Hawaii, You're Calling Me" by Gladys Rice & Vernon Dalhart (1918)
sound "My Hawaii, You're Calling Me" by Gladys Rice & Vernon Dalhart (1918)
"Somewhere In Hawaii" by Waikiki Hawaiian Orchestra; with Helen Louise & Frank Ferera (1918)
sound "Somewhere In Hawaii" by Waikiki Hawaiian Orchestra; with Helen Louise & Frank Ferera (1918)
"Sweet Hawaiian Moonlight (Tell Her of My Love)" by Gladys Rice & Evelyn Cox (1918)
sound "Sweet Hawaiian Moonlight (Tell Her of My Love)" by Gladys Rice & Evelyn Cox (1918)
"Aloha Sunset Land" by Homestead Trio (1920)
sound "Aloha Sunset Land" by Homestead Trio (1920)
Beautiful Hawaii
sound "Beautiful Hawaii" by Waikiki Hawaiian Orchestra (1920)
"Underneath Hawaiian Skies" by Campbell & Burr (1920)
sound "Underneath Hawaiian Skies" by Campbell & Burr (1920)
"Sweet Luana" by Gladys Rice & Elizabeth Lennox (1921)
sound "Sweet Luana" by Gladys Rice & Elizabeth Lennox (1921)
"Dreamy Hawaii" by Hawaiian Orchestra (1922)
sound "Dreamy Hawaii" by Hawaiian Orchestra (1922)
"Hawaiian Medley" by Warren B. Patterson & Nicholas A. Barbarito (1923)
sound "Hawaiian Medley" by Warren B. Patterson & Nicholas A. Barbarito (1923)
by Warren B. Patterson & Nicholas A. Barbarito
sound "Hawaiian Melodies" by Warren B. Patterson & Nicholas A. Barbarito (1923)
Don't Song Aloha When I Go
sound "Don't Sing Aloha When I Go" by Four Aristocrats (1927)
       
 
| top |
Creative Commons License
 
curve
curve
curve
Last modified July 12, 2012